Movies

Showtimes at right —–>

MOVIES THIS WEEK:

BOYHOOD (R)
Run time: 2 hours, 44 mins.
Filmed over 12 years with the same cast, this film is a groundbreaking story of growing up as seen through the eyes of a child named Mason, who literally grows up on screen before our eyes. This drama charts the rocky terrain of childhood like no other film has before. Snapshots of adolescence from road trips and family dinners to birthdays and graduations and all the moments in between become transcendent, set to a soundtrack spanning the years from Coldplay’s Yellow to Arcade Fire’s Deep Blue. The film is both a nostalgic time capsule of the recent past and an ode to growing up and parenting. It’s impossible not to watch Mason and his family without thinking about our own journey.

THE JUDGE (R)
Run time: 2 hours, 22 mins.
A successful lawyer returns to his hometown for his mother’s funeral only to discover that his estranged father, the town’s judge, is suspected of murder. He sets out to discover the truth and along the way reconnects with the family he walked away from years before. Robert Downey Jr and Robert Duvall co-star.

MY OLD LADY (PG13)
Run time: 1 hour, 47 mins.
Mathias inherits a Parisian apartment from his estranged father. But when he arrives in France to sell it, he discovers a tenant who is not prepared to budge. His apartment is a viager – an ancient French real estate system with complex rules about its resale – and feisty Mathilde, who has lived there with her daughter Chloé for years, can by contract collect payments from Mathias until her death. With no place to go, Mathias stays with Mathilde, instantly clashing with Chloé over his dealings with a property developer who wants the apartment. However, Mathias and Chloé discover a common ground of childhood pain and neglect. As they grow closer, Mathilde unveils a complex labyrinth of secrets that unites the trio in unexpected ways.

THE BOOK OF LIFE (PG)
Run time: 1 hour, 35 mins.
This film is a vibrant fantasy-adventure, tells the legend of Manolo, a conflicted hero and dreamer who sets off on an epic quest through magical, mythical and wondrous worlds in order to rescue his one true love and defend his village.

ALEXANDER & the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day (PG)
Run time: 1 hour, 31 mins.
Follows the exploits of 11-year-old Alexander as he experiences the most terrible and horrible day of his young life-a day that begins with gum stuck in his hair, followed by one calamity after another. But when Alexander tells his upbeat family about the misadventures of his disastrous day, he finds little sympathy and begins to wonder if bad things only happen to him. He soon learns that he’s not alone when his brother, sister, mom and dad all find themselves living through their own terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. Anyone who says there is no such thing as a bad day just hasn’t had one.

DRACULA UNTOLD (PG13)
Run time: 1 hour, 32 mins.
Explores the origin of Dracula, weaving vampire mythology with the true history of Prince Vlad the Impaler, depicting Dracula as a flawed hero in a tragic love story set in a dark age of magic and war. Why was it untold? You may find out.

THE TRIP TO ITALY (Not Rated)
Run time: 1 hour, 48 mins.
Michael Winterbottom’s largely improvised 2010 film, The Trip, took comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon—or semifictionalized versions thereof—on a restaurant tour around northern England. In this witty and incisive follow-up, Winterbottom reunites the pair for a new culinary road trip, retracing the steps of the Romantic poets’ grand tour of Italy and indulging in some sparkling banter and impersonation-offs. Rewhetting our palates from the earlier film, the characters enjoy mouthwatering meals in gorgeous settings from Liguria to Capri while riffing on subjects as varied as Batman’s vocal register, the artistic merits of “Jagged Little Pill,” and, of course, the virtue of sequels. Winterbottom trains his camera to capture the idyllic Italian landscape and the gastronomic treasures being prepared and consumed while keeping the film centered on the crackling chemistry between the two leads. The Trip to Italy effortlessly melds the brilliant comic interplay between Coogan and Brydon into quieter moments of self-reflection, letting audiences into their insightful ruminations on the nuances of friendship and the juggling of family and career. The result is a biting portrait of modern-day masculinity.